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How Silicon Valley is helping to put food on plates

Philanthropy isn’t a new concept to the ultra-smart, ultra-rich of Silicon Valley, but recently it’s become a healthy and delicious one.

There’s a movement going on in the region to help expand access to and connect those in need with healthy foods. And in a place where hype has real weight, more and more businesses are jumping on board to volunteer for and donate funding to this cause.

For example, the Veggielution Community Farm is an organic food purveyor whose goal is to expand access to fresh produce, putting healthy fruits and vegetables into the hands and onto the plates of those who need them most. The organization states that it aims to support healthy and thriving communities.

Likewise, the Silicon Valley Community Foundation held a fundraiser, Silicon Valley Gives, on May 6, raising more than $7.93 million for organizations such as Veggielution. From that fund drive, the Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties received $48,083 in donations; the Ecumencal Hunger Program received $5,930; and Veggielution received $19,475. And that’s just naming a few of the several food-specific nonprofits that serve the region.

Another example is the Silicon Valley Leadership Group and Ram Research Corporation’s partnership to create 60 salad bars at schools throughout the region. Doing so boasts a cost of about $2,625 in each school.

So why, in the land of the coolest apps and gadgets, is there effort going into feeding others? For one thing, children who go hungry don’t learn as well as those who are nourished. That sounds like a good investment to us.

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