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Simple additions to make your mashed potatoes even tastier

The much-maligned potato is an easy target for carb-haters who bill it as a worthless starch without any real nutrition benefits. While it’s true that any good diet should balance starches with other foods, potatoes offer a host of nutrition benefits, most notably when you skip the deep fryer.

Potatoes are loaded with vitamin B6, which helps protect cardiovascular health, promotes cell development and plays important roles in nervous system activity. Vitamin C is also plentiful in potatoes and is critical for healing wounds, blocking damage caused by free radicals and maintaining bone health, among other things. In addition, potatoes are a good source of potassium, fiber, protein and iron — do you really need more convincing?

While classic mashed potatoes are certainly delicious, you can impress dinner party guests with one of our slightly more sophisticated options. To cut down on fat and cholesterol, we’re using 2% milk and have eliminated sour cream. We use real butter though, because mashed potatoes just aren’t the same without it.

 

Roasted garlic mashed potatoes

Cut the top off a head of garlic to slightly expose cloves. Drizzle with olive oil, wrap tightly in foil and bake in the oven at 375°F for 45 minutes, or until soft.

While garlic is roasting, wash and cut 1.5 to 2 pounds of red potatoes into chunks, leaving skin on to add texture. Place potatoes in medium-sized pot, cover with cold water and salt generously. Bring potatoes to a boil over medium heat and cook until tender. Drain potatoes.

While potatoes are cooking, add ½ cup of 2% milk and 2 tablespoons of butter to a small pot. Warm over low heat, being careful not to boil the milk.

Transfer potatoes to a bowl and mash. Slowly begin adding the milk/butter mixture and continue mashing. Be careful not to add the liquid all at once, because you will likely not need all of it. When mashed potatoes have reached your desired creaminess, add salt, pepper and the roasted garlic. Mix gently to combine and serve.

 

Mustard mashed potatoes

Wash and chop 1.5 to 2 pounds of gold potatoes. Place potatoes in medium-sized pot, cover with cold water and salt generously. Bring potatoes to a boil over medium heat and cook until tender. Drain potatoes.

While potatoes are cooking, add ½ cup 2% milk and 2 tablespoons of butter to a small pot. Warm over low heat, being careful not to boil the milk.

Transfer potatoes to bowl and mash. Slowly begin adding the milk/butter mixture and continue mashing. Be careful not to add the liquid all at once, because you will likely not need all of it. When mashed potatoes have reached your desired creaminess, add salt and pepper. Mix in 2 tablespoons of wholegrain mustard, adding more if desired, and serve.

 

Caramelized shallot mashed potatoes

Wash and chop 1.5 to 2 pounds of gold potatoes. Place potatoes in medium-sized pot, cover with cold water and salt generously. Bring potatoes to a boil over medium heat and cook until tender. Drain potatoes.

While potatoes are cooking, slice 1 cup of shallots. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a saucepan, add shallots and cook over medium-low heat, stirring often, for 15 minutes or until shallots are caramelized. Remove from heat.

Add ½ cup of 2% milk and 2 tablespoons of butter to a small pot. Warm over low heat, being careful not to boil the milk.

Transfer potatoes to bowl and mash. Slowly begin adding the milk/butter mixture and continue mashing. Be careful not to add the liquid all at once, because you will likely not need all of it. When mashed potatoes have reached your desired creaminess, add salt and pepper. Fold in caramelized shallots and serve.


Comments

Submitted by Tony on

Instead of sour cream or butter (which is not necessary), we add "chunk style 4% milk fat cottage cheese."

Dash of salt is optional, and the cottage cheese adds so much creaminess and nutrition w/o even noticing.

P.S. - No milk needed, since it can make the potatoes too watery. Basically, one 8 ounce container of cottage cheese to about 2 lbs of potatoes. Just mash together and enjoy.

Submitted by Tony on

Instead of sour cream or butter (which is not necessary), we add "chunk style 4% milk fat cottage cheese."

Dash of salt is optional, and the cottage cheese adds so much creaminess and nutrition w/o even noticing.

P.S. - No milk needed, since it can make the potatoes too watery. Basically, one 8 ounce container of cottage cheese to about 2 lbs of potatoes. Just mash together and enjoy.

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