You can fix it! 8 easy DIY projects that YOU can do


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Some people have a reputation for not being able to fix anything around the home. Do you count yourself in that group? Maybe your friends jokingly refer to you as Mr. or Mrs. Don’t Fix-It?

There’s no need to panic. Here’s your chance to prove you’re handy with these eight simple repairs that even you, yes you, can do!


1. Weak flush

Does the toilet flush like it’s suffering from a case of low testosterone? It often occurs when the spray jets clog with sediment and calcium deposits. Bring back that strong, manly flush with a good scrubbing under the toilet rim. Use a stiff wire brush to clear the jets.


2. Ripped vinyl

Soap isn’t just for potty mouths. Use soap to camouflage small tears in no-wax floors by rubbing it along the rip to fill it. For other vinyl floors, use a silicone-based seam sealer.


3. Scuffed linoleum

Did someone tap dance on your shiny floor and leave unsightly black marks? White toothpaste and a cloth, or a pencil eraser removes the marks. WD-40, a loyal friend to homeowners, also does the trick. Be sure to remove the greasy residue with soap and water.


4. Wall holes

Do multiple piercings have your walls looking like Swiss cheese? You don't even need to go to the hardware store. Use toothpaste to close the holes.


5. Sticky lock

Key stuck in your lock? Spray a dab of WD-40 into the lock for smooth-as-butter operation. Or, try graphite powder, which also loosens the lock, but doesn’t cause an oily buildup. Just don’t tell your BFF, WD-40 (shhh).


6. Squeaky, creaky doors

Does the bedroom door sound like you’re in a horror movie? Stop squeaking door hinges with — you guessed it — WD-40, or a little petroleum jelly.


7. Stuck windows

This is another horror movie staple that makes it hard to get away form the bad guys. Spray a silicone lubricant onto a cloth and wipe it along the window tracks for an easy escape.


8. Curling countertop

A peeling laminate countertop looks worse than sun-burned skin. Use contact cement or another adhesive and press the laminate into place. Secure it with painter’s tape or place a heavy object on top until it dries.

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Check out more DIY tips from a handyman. This article was originally written by Oseye Boyd of Angie’s List.

Angie’s List offers consumer advice, local deals and reviews on everything from home repair to health care. Before you hire, find detailed reviews on roofers, plumbers, house cleaners, dentists and more at AngiesList.com.